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banner that reads 'What Black History Month Means to Me' alongside portrait of Angelique

What Black History Month Means to Me

By: Angelique Riley

Meet Angelique

My name is Angelique Riley, and I have been at Grane Hospice Care, King of Prussia (an Abode Healthcare and BrightSpring Health Services company), for a little over two and a half years. I joined Grane after spending twenty years managing Life Enrichment in Continuing Care Retirement Centers. I found Life Enrichment rewarding, but it was time to hang up that hat and move on to another venture.

I chose to work in Hospice Care to share my natural gift of helping people during the most difficult time of their lives. I take pride in sharing compassion, support, and a great deal of care with our patients. It is a great honor to be spotlighted in our employee newsletter, and to share what Black History Month means to me.

What Black History Month Means to Angelique

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States, where it is also known as African American History Month. It began as a way of remembering important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. Now that you have the Wikipedia definition of Black History Month; let me tell you what Black History Month really means…

Black History cannot be contained or limited to a single month. I grew up in a family where we honored and embraced our heritage year-round. My siblings and I were educated by our father on the rich history of African Americans. He taught us about inventors, writers, educators, musicians, and other notable Black figures.

It was important to my father that we had knowledge of our own history. We grew up as military children and were exposed to many different cultures and environments. My father prided himself in educating us on African American studies because he knew our schools and society, would more likely teach us an inaccurate version of our history, if they mentioned African Americans at all.

American schools teach students about Dr. Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks, and the enslavement of African American people in the US. Those are important topics to cover, but that barely scrapes the surface of African American contributions to our society. Sparse lesson plans fail to mention the large numbers of African American scientists, physicians, attorneys, and professors who have made huge contributions to American progress.

A Personal Story

A quick funny story: When I was in World History Class my junior year in High School in Lawton, Oklahoma, the teacher presented a lecture about religion in the African American community. I remember cringing in my seat, my spirit stirred with frustration because the lesson was filled with errors about my history and my culture. I could not remain silent.

Each time that the teacher mispronounced a name, gave an inaccurate date, or worse, attributed an accomplishment to the wrong person, I spoke up and corrected him. After I contradicted him four or five times, the teacher grew so frustrated that he shouted,

DO YOU WANT TO TEACH THE CLASS?”. I rose to my feet and said, “Yes, I do”.

It did not end well for me that day. I was sent to the office immediately and punished with an In-House Suspension. Despite the repercussions, I never regretted what I did.

My experience confirmed my father’s prediction that the school was not going to teach the proper information on African American History. Since my father took the time to teach me, I knew my history and had the conviction to share it with my peers.

I shared this story to illustrate the importance of teaching African American History and embracing it as an ongoing celebration in the African American Community. I am grateful to see schools, businesses and the community recognize Black History.

Black Is Love

The month of February is a time to honor our ancestors and their hidden or overlooked contributions. It is also a time to reflect on the work still to be done.

Black History Month is a reminder that Black Is Love. I love being an African American woman and getting to reflect with others who are also proud to be African American. Black History Month is an invitation for others to join in the ongoing celebration of black excellence. It is unity in its highest form.

chairlift at bottom of steps

Bringing Seniors Home from the Hospital

It can be stressful when an elderly loved one is admitted to a hospital or healthcare facility. You likely have a lot on your mind, and what to do when they are discharged may be one of the last things you are thinking about. However, it’s best to think about it early on so you are prepared to bring your loved one home.

Ask Questions

You won’t know if you don’t ask. Don’t be afraid to ask your medical team any questions you may have. There are no silly questions when it comes to your loved one’s well-being.

While every person and situation is different, here are some questions you might want to ask (or might help you think of other questions you have):

Preparing Home

Oftentimes, bringing someone home from a hospital or facility is more involved than simply getting in the car and driving them home. Whether they are going to their own home or to yours, there may be steps you need to take to make the home safe and accessible. A safe return home can be the difference between being readmitted to a hospital and a full recovery.

Safe Entries

Let’s start with the first place your loved one will encounter when coming home: the entry. Make sure there are no cracks or other damage to sidewalks or steps that could cause them to trip. If there are steps (and they can use them), make sure there are sturdy railings for them to hold onto. If they cannot use steps, have a ramp installed.

Remove Fall Hazards

Falls are a leading cause of injury for seniors, so it is important to reduce the risk for falls as much as possible.

Make the Bathroom Safe

The majority of seniors’ falls occur in the bathroom, so it’s an important room to focus on when preparing the home for your loved one. You can help make the bathroom safer by:

Protect Against Fire

Remove fire hazards from the home, including:

Remember to check the batteries in and test all smoke detectors.

Stairs

If your loved one lives in a home with multiple floors, make sure railings are sturdy and safe. Look into stairlifts if they are not able to use the steps. If possible, eliminate the need to use the steps at all and set up a one-level living environment.

Medical Alert Systems

If your loved one is able to live at home alone, medical alert systems can be great for their safety and your peace of mind. There are many options available that can be worn around their neck. If they fall, they can press a button and be connected to help right away.

Equipment Needed

Depending on your loved one’s needs, special equipment (known as durable medical equipment) may be needed when they return home. This can include:

Durable medical equipment (DME) that is prescribed by your doctor is covered by Medicare Part B. Medicare offers a great tool on their website that can help you find places near you to get the DME you need.

The Bottom Line

Have a plan for the day your loved one comes home. Who will be picking them up? What time? Do you need to get any medications or supplies on your way home? Having a plan will make the transition home go smoothly.

Talk to your loved one’s medical team about any other information you need to know. Ask them to go over things like medication and warning signs to look out for and when to call the doctor’s office.

If you can, include your loved one in conversations with the doctor about what to expect when they get home. Life at home will likely be different for them, and that can be difficult to cope with. Hearing it from the doctor and having the chance to ask questions can help make the transition easier for them.

There can be a lot to do before bringing a senior home from the hospital or a facility. Having conversations and starting preparations early can help make the transition smoother for everyone. 

nurse and patient

Who Makes Up the Hospice Care Team?

There are a lot of things to take into consideration when considering hospice for yourself or for someone you love. In our previous blog post, we discussed the important topic of who pays for hospice. Now, we want to talk about who makes up the hospice care team.

Oasis Healthcare uses an interdisciplinary approach to care. This means all members of the team work together to determine the best plan of care for each individual patient.

Physician(s)

It’s a common misconception that you cannot continue to use your primary care physician (PCP) when you choose hospice. This is not true. The patient’s PCP will continue to be as involved in their care as you want them to be, working closely with the hospice team to determine the best care plan options. The hospice team will keep them informed of all the patient’s wants and needs.

A Hospice Medical Director will also be part of the hospice care team. They oversee all clinical aspects of hospice care and provide medical education to community and facility staff. The Medical Director also actively participates in the admission, eligibility, and recertification decisions and provides overall direction to the rest of the hospice team.

Nurse

Although they receive guidance from the Medical Director, the hospice nurse is the one who manages the patient’s care. The nurse will visit based on a schedule that meets the patient’s individual needs. Their main purpose is to provide pain and symptom management, keeping the patient as comfortable as possible. They will also administer medication as necessary and will tend to any wounds the patient may have.

There is always a hospice nurse on call – 24/7, 365 – to answer any questions that may arise.

Certified Nursing Assistant

A Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), also referred to as an Aide, plays a pivotal role in the hospice care team. They are trained caregivers who work under the supervision of a registered nurse to assist with personal care and other duties around the home. CNAs will help the patient with things like bathing, dressing, grooming, and feeding. They will also help with light housekeeping.

CNAs also provide education to family/caregivers so they can feel confident in caring for their loved one when hospice is not there. This can include how to safely transfer your loved one from bed to a chair and back or the best way to help them get from room to room.

CNAs provide a special level of care for hospice patients and their family/caregivers.

Medical Social Worker

Dealing with a terminal illness can be delicate and difficult for the patient and family. The hospice social worker is here to provide emotional support for you and your family, as well as to help with things like:

Chaplain

Our pastoral care team is comprised of ordained ministers with various religious affiliations who provide spiritual support to the patient and their family throughout the entire hospice journey. They provide an interfaith forum where the spiritual needs of the individual come first, not the denomination. Services they provide include praying with the patient/family, reading scripture, or even just sitting quietly with the patient. Chaplains can provide or arrange for religious sacraments or other religious rites. They may also help with funeral or memorial service arrangements.

Bereavement Counselor/Coordinator

The grieving process doesn’t wait until the patient has passed to begin. It is completely normal to feel grief when facing the impending loss of someone you love. Our bereavement coordinators are here for you and your family whenever you need them most. Their support begins at the time the patient is admitted to hospice and continues for up to 13 months after death. Everyone grieves differently, but no one should ever have to go through it alone. Please know, our team is here for you.

Volunteer(s)

Volunteers are specially trained to support the patient and their family by providing services such as reading, art/music therapy, pet therapy, and so much more. There are also Veteran volunteers for Veteran patients who would like visits from a volunteer who served in the military.

Volunteers can have such a huge impact on a patient’s hospice journey. If you are interested in becoming a hospice volunteer, you can learn more about the program here.

The Family/Caregiver

The final and most important part of the hospice is care team is you, the patient’s family/caregiver. You will be involved in your loved one’s care every step of the way. Starting from the very first discussion about our services, our team will coordinate with you throughout your entire hospice journey to care for your spouse, parent, or other loved one as though they are our own.

If you’d like to learn more about the hospice care team, please contact us. We are here to answer any questions you may have.

Text ‘Who pays for hospice?’ on a background with plants growing out of piles of money

Who Pays for Hospice?

‘Who pays for hospice?’ It’s a very common question. And it’s a very good question. If you are considering hospice care for someone you love (or maybe for yourself), you have a lotof things to think about. Worrying about how you are going to pay for hospice care should not be one of them.

At Oasis, we strive to provide exceptional care for our patients and their families. This begins with providing education and resources to ensure everyone involved understands what to expect when choosing our hospice services. That being said, we want to dive into how hospice is paid for.

Medicare

Medicare Part A covers hospice through the Medicare Hospice Benefit, which states you pay nothing for hospice care. To qualify for hospice care, a hospice doctor and your own doctor (if you have one) must certify that you are terminally ill. This means you have a life expectancy of 6 months or less, should the disease run its natural course. When agreeing to hospice, you will sign a statement that confirms you are choosing hospice care rather than other benefits Medicare covers to treat your terminal illness and related conditions. Simply put, you are agreeing that you are choosing comfort care instead of curative treatment.

Coverage includes:

Medicaid

Medicaid provides health coverage to millions of Americans, including eligible low-income adults, children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. It also pays for hospice care for terminally ill individuals in many states. Similar to Medicare, hospice services through Medicaid include:

To qualify, a hospice provider must obtain a physician certification that a patient is terminally ill, and hospice services must be reasonable and necessary for the management of the terminal illness and related conditions. A hospice plan of care must be established prior to services being provided.

Veteran Benefits

The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) covers hospice care for Veterans who are in the final phase of their lives. They work closely with community and home hospice agencies to provide care in the home. Since hospice is part of the VHA Standards Medical Benefits package, all enrolled Veterans are eligible for services as long as they meet the clinical need for service.

There are no copays for hospice care, whether it is provided by the VA or an organization with a VA contract.

Private Health Insurance

Many private insurance companies provide some coverage for hospice care. Check with your insurer to determine whether hospice is covered. Qualifications and covered benefits vary based on the private insurer.

What if you don’t have insurance?

If you don’t have insurance coverage and cannot afford hospice care, it may be provided free of charge through financial assistance such as donations, gifts, grants, or other community sources.

Still Have Questions?

Please feel free to contact us if you’d like more information about how hospice care is paid for. Our team is always here to answer any questions you may have.

Close up of woman’s hands folded on her lap with a doctor holding a clipboard with medical chart

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

By: Dr. Laura Mantine

The cervix is the organ that provides an opening between the vagina and the uterus. Normally, old or damaged cells in a woman’s cervix will stop dividing and are replaced by healthy, young cells. Cervical dysplasia occurs when these old or damaged cells continue to divide in the superficial layer of the cervix. When cervical dysplasia is not treated, it can grow and spread into the deeper tissues of the cervix, developing into cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is a common malignant tumor of the female reproductive system. In the world, cervical cancer is the third most common type of cancer. However, the use of Pap smear screening has made it far less common in the United States.

Detection

Regular Pap smear screening tests can detect cervical dysplasia long before it develops into cancer. Cervical dysplasia is 100% treatable when identified early. Once cervical cancer has developed, the prognosis varies depending on the cancer’s stage of advancement as well as a woman’s age, general health status and comorbid conditions. It generally does not produce any symptoms in its earliest stages. When symptoms do occur, they may indicate that the cancer has progressed to more advanced stages. Symptoms may include abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, low back or pelvic pain, pain during intercourse and periods that are longer and heavier than usual.

Treatment

Treatment of cervical cancer begins with seeking regular medical care throughout a woman’s life. Regular medical care allows a health care professional to best evaluate risks of developing cervical cancer, perform Pap smear screening, and promptly order further diagnostic testing as needed. The goal of cervical cancer treatment is to permanently cure the cancer resulting in complete remission of the disease. Cervical cancer treatment plans are multifaceted and individualized to the type and stage of the cancer with consideration of a patient’s coexisting diseases or conditions. Treatment of cervical cancer or cervical dysplasia may include a combination of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation.

Potential Complications

Cervical cancer can lead to life-threatening complications especially if they go undetected and untreated. Complications are caused by an abnormal rapid growth of old or damaged cells in the cervix that can spread to other organs, such as the lungs, bladder, liver and intestines. Over time, the spread of cancer interferes with organ function and vital body processes. Serious complications can include recurring cervical cancer after treatment and infertility due to treatment.

Hospice Care

In cases in which cervical cancer has progressed to an advanced stage and has become unresponsive to treatment, the goal shifts away from curing the disease and focuses on symptom management. Hospice care is available to help people in their last phases of an incurable illness live as fully and comfortably as possible. Hospice care for a patient with advanced cancer focuses on quality of life and is designed to address a wide range of symptoms including pain, poor appetite, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting. Hospice patients with advanced cancer experience fewer hospitalizations, emergency calls and invasive procedures. Hospice patients have lower costs of care and greater likelihood of dying in their preferred setting, compared to patients not referred to hospice. Hospice will provide medications and supplies and provide inpatient care when a patient’s symptoms cannot be managed at home. Hospice can also provide around-the-clock care in the home to manage acute symptoms if needed. Also, a hospice clinician is accessible any time of day or night to ensure symptoms are managed as soon as possible. Lastly, hospice care also provides emotional support that benefits advanced cancer patients and their families. Timely and appropriate identification of hospice eligible patients increases the likelihood that patients and their families will benefit from compassionate, end-of-life care.

References:

National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, NHPCO Facts and Figures, 2018 Edition. Retrieved from: https://www.nhpco.org/research/

American Cancer Society, Cancer Facts & Figures 2019 Retrieved from: https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2019.html

What are Palliative Care and Hospice Care? 2019. National Institute on Aging. Retrieved from: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-are-palliative-care-and-hospice-care

Teno, et al. (2004). Family perspectives on end-of-life care at the last place of care. JAMA, 7;291(1):88-93

Elderly father and adult child sitting and having a serious discussion

End-of-Life Conversations

People often shy away from talking about end-of-life wishes. In fact, the Conversation Project found that although 92% of people feel it’s important to discuss end-of-life wishes, only 32% actually do. But it doesn’t have to be a scary topic that you avoid. In fact, it’s incredibly important to have the discussion.

Dear Caregiver,

As your loved one grows older, they may be hesitant to talk about their end-of-life wishes. And you may not want to bring it up because it forces you to face the fact that they won’t be here forever. Trust us, we get it. However, it is incredibly important to talk about it. Here’s why.

Gives Them the Chance to Die Well

End-of-life conversations give us the chance to die well. What does that mean? It means our wishes are known and followed, and we have the opportunity to live our life – right up to the end – the way we choose to.

By discussing their end-of-life wishes, you will have a better understanding of how they want things to happen. This will prevent you from needing to try to guess or figure it out on your own.

Makes it Easier on Family and Caregivers

That brings us to our next point. Knowing what a person wants makes it easier on those caring for them. If you discuss it with your loved one, you don’t have to worry about making the right decisions on their behalf because you already know what they want. If you don’t discuss it, you may worry if you are doing right by them. Talking about what they want and having a clear plan eliminates this pressure.

It’s also not uncommon – in situations where the patient becomes unresponsive, such as in a medical emergency – for the family to argue over what the right decision is. This just creates added and unnecessary stress and trauma for everyone. All of which can be avoided by knowing and understanding your loved one’s wishes ahead of time.

Starting the Conversation

Your loved one may already know what their end-of-life wishes are. They might just be unsure of how to bring it up. Maybe they just need you to start the conversation. But how do you?

This Conversation Starter Guide is a wonderful tool to help us get the conversation started. It includes prompts to answer to help cover all the bases. Encourage your loved one to fill it out, with you or on their own. Then, you can sit down together and talk about their answers. If you have this guide printed out, you can take your own notes and save it so you are prepared.

Keep the Conversation Going

It’s important to keep the conversation going. Our wishes can change over time so it’s important to keep one another updated.

End-of-life planning isn’t about dying – it’s about living. Understanding your loved one’s end-of-life wishes allows you to understand how they want to live their last months, weeks, and days. So, start the conversation and keep it going.

Close up of hand overtop elderly loved one’s hands

Choosing Hospice: How to Know the Time is Right

A life-limiting illness comes with a lot of difficult decisions to consider. One of those decisions is when it may be time to consider hospice care. This can be an intimidating decision to make, so we are sharing some tips to help you determine when the time is right.

Understanding Hospice

Hospice is an interdisciplinary approach to end-of-life care. When a patient and their family choose hospice, they are choosing to switch the focus from curative treatment to comfort care. This simply means the goal is now to manage the patient’s pain and other symptoms to keep them as comfortable as possible. Symptoms hospice can help treat include pain, shortness of breath, and restlessness.

Many people think hospice is a place. However, this is not true. Hospice care can be provided wherever the patient calls home, including their own home or a nursing facility.

Patients are generally considered to be eligible for hospice when a physician determines they have a life expectancy of six months or less.

Hospice Does Not Mean You’re Giving Up

One misconception is that when you choose hospice, you are giving up. This is not at all the case. Hospice is not just about the dying process, it’s about the end-stage of the life-limiting illness, as well. When you choose hospice for your loved one, you are choosing quality of life for them. No more treatments that make them feel sick in attempt to buy them more time. Just focusing on making sure they are comfortable and at peace for whatever time they have.

How to Know the Time is Right

So how do you know it’s the right time to consider hospice? Below are some of the common indicators:

Remember, these indicators are just guidelines and do not replace a physician’s evaluation. If you think it may be time for hospice, talk to your doctor. You can also contact us at anytime to learn more.

Close up of human body diagram, highlighting the pancreas

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness for Hospice  

By: Dr. Margarita David Ph.D., RN

Pancreatic cancer affects over 60,000 people in the United States. Continue reading to learn more about pancreatic cancer in honor of Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month.

What is pancreatic cancer?

Pancreatic cancer is a cancer that develops in the pancreas. The pancreas helps regulate the metabolism of sugar and aids in the digestion of foods.

What causes pancreatic cancer?

Although the exact cause of pancreatic cancer is still unknown, some risk factors that may contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer include:

Physical symptoms of pancreatic cancer

Many of the symptoms of pancreatic cancer are also common with other types of cancers. These may include:

How is pancreatic cancer diagnosed?

There are several ways that pancreatic cancer is diagnosed:

Blood tests

Three blood tests can help diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer:

  1. Liver function test. Measures the amount of bilirubin in the blood. If high this may indicate a tumor is blocking the bile duct.
  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen. Elevated levels in the blood are found in patients with cancers of the GI (gastrointestinal) tract.
  3. CA 19-9. Individuals with pancreatic cancer often have an elevation of this protein in their blood.

Biopsy

If blood work and imaging indicate the possibility of having pancreatic cancer, a biopsy (a tissue sample from the pancreas) is taken to confirm the diagnosis. A biopsy is the gold standard for a definitive pancreatic cancer diagnosis.

How does hospice help pancreatic cancer patients

Pancreatic cancer can be extremely painful, making your quality of life more difficult toward the end of life. Hospice care allows people to live their final stages in peace by providing:

Comfort for end of life

The end of life can be a very stressful, uncomfortable, and anxiety-provoking time. A hospice team can help provide the comfort the patient needs physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

Spiritual guidance

Hospice care takes care of you physically and emotionally during the end of life. The team consists of a social worker and chaplain who will work with you and your family to ensure your spiritual needs are met. Hospice provides compassionate care that is supportive of both the patient and their families through the end of life and throughout the grieving process.

Helps with family and loved ones

Caring for sick loved ones can be an exhausting endeavor, which is why hospice care takes over your care so that your family gets a much-needed break. Your hospice team can also coordinate respite periods for your caregiver.

If you’d like to learn more about hospice care for pancreatic patients, please contact us.

Close up of girl hugging her legs and sitting by the window with view of holiday lights outside in the background

Tips for Navigating Grief This Holiday Season

The holiday season is here, and what is a time of joy and togetherness for most can be a time full of sadness and grief for others. The holidays are meant to be spent with those we love, so how can you be expected to feel like celebrating when someone you love is no longer there to celebrate with you?

If you are missing a loved one this holiday season, here are some tips to help you take a step back from the grief and survive the holidays.

Tip One: Be prepared for grief triggers.

Let’s be honest, they are everywhere during the holidays. Preparing for these triggers and having a plan for coping with them can sometimes make the triggers more manageable as you encounter them.

Tip Two: It’s okay to take a break from togetherness.

Plan to get some space from the holiday chaos if you need it. Being surrounded by family and friends is great, but all at once can be emotionally overwhelming and hard to overcome. Don’t feel guilty about your grief. It is important to be conscious of your limits and take some time to recollect yourself.

Tip Three: Seek gratitude.

The holidays are a time to gather together, eat good food, and share what we’re thankful for. If you’ve recently lost a loved one, it can be hard to feel thankful when you are grieving. Although you may be focusing on the loss, try to remember the good things that relationship brought into your life. Search for that gratitude.

Tip Four: Decide which traditions you want to change or keep.

Acknowledge that things will be different this year. Some holiday traditions will remind you of your lost loved one, but it is okay to limit which of these you allow yourself to remember or not. Take time to prepare for which traditions will make you happy and which will overwhelm you.

Tip Five: Say yes to help.

Although you may normally be the one to host during the holidays, this year may be too much to take on alone after losing your loved one. Accept help when it’s offered. Remember that there is no shame in saying yes. Those who love you want to help.

Feel Joy Through the Grief

The holidays can be hard for those who have recently lost a loved one. Grief can be especially unavoidable during these times, but it is important to remember that you can still feel joy through the grief. Taking these tips into account can help you prepare for that grief and make your holidays more enjoyable.

Close up of elderly hand overtop younger hands

Celebrating Caregivers

In 2020, an estimated 41.8 million adults in the United States were caregivers of someone 50 years of age or older. That’s one in six Americans. In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, we want to take the opportunity to applaud all these caregivers for all they do for those they love.

Dear Caregiver,

You work round the clock to care for someone you love. Maybe it’s a parent. Maybe it’s a spouse or partner. No matter who it is, you are committed to doing the best you can for them because you love them. And because you know they would do the same for you. But it’s not easy. We know that. So, we want you to take a minute to yourself right now to read this. Because this is for YOU.

Caregiving Isn’t Easy

You have taken on the responsibility of being the primary caregiver for a loved one who is ill. That’s no small task. You are there for them at all hours of the day and night- whenever they may need you.

Being a caregiver can be stressful on its own, but many of you are not only a caregiver. Whether you have a full or part-time job, volunteer, have children to care for, or anything in between – you have other responsibilities also. Juggling all those responsibilities can be overwhelming at times, and with all these things to take care of, you don’t often have time to stop to take care of yourself.

Find a Good Support System

You don’t have to do it all on your own. Lean on friends and family for help and support. When it starts to feel like it’s too much, call a friend or loved one. Ask them for help or just to talk or listen. A strong support system is essential.

Maybe you feel like your friends and family don’t understand what you’re going through, and you want to talk to someone who has a similar situation. There are support groups available for caregivers. Through these, you can meet others who have similar situations as you. You can share stories with them or share tips with one another. At the end of the day, having someone you can lean on is so important.

Remember to Take Time for You

With everything you need to get done in a day, we understand that it can be easy to neglect yourself and your own needs. However, it’s incredibly important that you take time for yourself. Do your best to carve out time to do something you enjoy. Do something that is for you and no one else. It’s not selfish. You NEED to do it.

It’s important to be able to take some time to do something that helps you decompress. Go for a walk. Read a book. Listen to a podcast. Whatever helps you unwind after a long day- do it! You need this opportunity to recharge so you can be at your best.

Show Yourself Some Grace

We understand it can feel overwhelming at times, but we want you to know you are doing great! You aren’t going to be at 110% every day. You may have an ‘off day,’ and that’s okay. We all have them. Just remember to show yourself some grace. You have taken on a huge role, and it’s not easy. You won’t be perfect – no one is. But each day, you rise to the challenge and do what you need to do to be there for your loved one. That’s what matters.

Don’t give up. And don’t ever doubt yourself. You are amazing!

Yours truly,

CompassionCare Hospice

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